Next Generation Dx Summit
2013 Archived Content

Cancer Molecular Markers to Guide Therapy 

Day 1 | Day 2 | Short Courses | Download Brochure 

Recommended Pre-Conference Short Courses*

Overcoming Challenges of Working with FFPE Samples 

Circulating Tumor Cells and Cancer Stem Cells from Research to Clinic 


*Separate registration required

Scientific Advisory Board

Joseph M. Carroll, Ph.D., Associate Director, Business Development, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU)
Christopher L. Corless, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Pathology and Medical Director, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University
Joe Gray, Ph.D., Associate Director for Translational Research for the Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU); Director, OHSU Center for Spatial Systems Biomedicine (OCSSB) and Gordon Moore Chair of Biomedical Engineering, OHSU School of Medicine


TUESDAY, AUGUST 20

7:30 am Registration and Morning Coffee


BIOMARKER DISCOVERY 

8:30 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Joe Gray, Ph.D., Associate Director, Translational Research for the Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU); Director, OHSU Center for Spatial Systems Biomedicine (OCSSB) and Gordon Moore Chair of Biomedical Engineering, OHSU School of Medicine


8:40 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Total Cancer Care: Developing a Molecular Markers Approach for Targeted Therapies

William S. DaltonWilliam S. Dalton, M.D., Ph.D., CEO, M2Gen; Director, Personalized Medicine Institute, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Critical to using molecular markers to match patients to the best therapies is the development of a biorepository in parallel with the development of a data warehouse and an information system containing patient’s clinical and molecular data. The Total Cancer Care™ Protocol, now with >95K consented patients, >33K tumors and >16K genetic profiles, provides a foundation to accomplish the goal of targeted therapies.

9:10 Multiplex Mutation Screening and other Assay Technologies in Support of a Personalized Cancer Medicine Registry

Christopher L. CorlessChristopher L. Corless, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Pathology and Medical Director, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University

Making personalized cancer care a reality requires novel approaches to finding treatment targets in cancers, because current single-gene assays are not adequate for the growing spectrum of actionable mutations. This presentation will focus on the opportunities and challenges of introducing new multiplexed and next-gen sequencing technologies into clinical laboratories.

9:40 Next-Generation Sequencing and Target-Based Approach in Early-Phase Clinical Trials in Cancer

Filip JankuFilip Janku, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, (Phase I Clinical Trials Program), The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

This presentation will outline the role of novel comprehensive genomic technologies in early-phase clinical trials in cancer. In addition, this presentation will suggest how early-phase clinical trials can be expanded from dose finding to proof-of-concept studies.

 

10:10 Coffee Break

11:00 Innovations in Next-Generation Sequencing: Enhancing Understanding of Tumor Biology

Steve ShakSteve Shak, M.D., CMO, Genomic Health

 

 

 

11:30 The Role of Clinical Grade Next-Generation Sequencing in Cancer Diagnostics: Foundation Medicine’s Clinical Experience

Gary PalmerGary Palmer, M.D., J.D., MBA, MPH, Senior Vice President, Medical Affairs and Commercial Development, Foundation Medicine

Our experience with targeted next-generation sequencing in the clinic: the pitfalls and the promises. What we have learned from our first 2,000+ cases that will optimize the value of targeted next-generation sequencing to the clinician, the patient, and the payor.

 

 

12:00 Q & A with Speakers

12:30 Lunch on Your Own

 

BIOMARKER ANALYSIS 

2:15 Chairperson’s Remarks

Christopher L. Corless, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Pathology and Medical Director, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University

 

2:20 Keynote Presentation: Identifying Tumor Intrinsic and Extrinsic Predictive Markers

Joe GrayJoe Gray, Ph.D., Associate Director, Translational Research for the Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU); Director, OHSU Center for Spatial Systems Biomedicine (OCSSB) and Gordon Moore Chair of Biomedical Engineering, OHSU School of Medicine

This talk will focus on new approaches to identification of molecular features intrinsic to tumors and from the extrinsic tumor micro environments that interact to determine responses to pathway targeted therapies.  The talk will link results from analysis of well characterized in vitro models to clinical performance.

2:50 Functionalizing the Cancer Genome: A Mutation-Driven View

Gordon MillsGordon Mills, M.D., Ph.D., Co-Director, Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy (IPCT), Chairman & Professor, Department of Systems Biology, Wiess Distinguished University Chair in Cancer Medicine, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

Genomic aberrations have proven to be amongst the strongest and most robust biomarkers. However, emerging data suggests that we need to evaluate the consequences and effects of each aberration independently. For example, both activating and inactivating mutations in BRAF can alter patient outcome and require different therapies. I will describe a high-throughput platform to assess the consequences of specific point mutations and a method to identify therapeutic liabilities.

3:20 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

3:35 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

4:10 Use of Whole Genome Outlier Analysis to Identify Occult Biomarkers of Drug Response

David B. SolitDavid B. Solit, M.D., Director, Developmental Therapeutics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

The use of next-generation sequencing methods including whole genome sequencing to identify the molecular basis of drug sensitivity and resistance will be discussed.

 

4:40 Use of the Microenvironment to Develop Diagnostic and Prognostic Multigene Profiles for Prostate Cancer

Dan Mercola, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Director, Translational Cancer Biology University of California at Irvine

The gene activity changes in the microenvironment of prostate cancer can be used to form multigene profiles for diagnosis and for prognosis. Diagnosis based on gene expression in stroma by detection of "presence of tumor" and indicates the need for rapid re-biopsy. Prognosis is classification as early or no relapse following radical prostatectomy. The methods of profile development will be discussed.

5:10 Wine and Cheese Pairing Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

6:10 Close of Day



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